On Not Meeting Demelza in Poldark Country

73 thoughts on “On Not Meeting Demelza in Poldark Country”

    1. It is wise to go slow. Adi was ambitious. He kept dragging me down those bloody heather covered slopes which had the hairs standing at my nape in alarm. I am an adventure seeker but running down spiky slopes is Not my idea of fun. Also some paths were so full of crumbly old rocks that I almost cried my way down as I had visions of sliding all the way down inside of simply walking down. But thank you, Angela. Do you watch Poldark?

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      1. That sounds like enough thrilling adventures for one day XD
        And no, I don’t watch Poldark, I hadn’t actually heard of it till you mentioned it in the post. I should go look more into it 🙂

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    1. I have shot a video of it where he disappears around a rock and then he hears those words, pops right back and says, “Huh, what about the husband?” Thank you Miriam, it was just so dramatic that it took my breath away x

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  1. Luscious landscape photos! The ruins were stark and beautiful in their decay. I’ve never seen Poldark but we do get it on PBS. I’m going to try and catch it on one of the streaming channels. Interesting history about the tin miners. Such a hard life! A number of tin miners from Cornwall, England immigrated to Grass Valley, California to work in the gold mines because it required the same skills for deep tin mining. By the way, stubbornness is a trait shared by a lot of husbands my married friends also agree! 🙂

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    1. Oh yes, I was going to write about them but then I realised it was going to be a thesis! Cousin Jacks they were referred to as. I am assuming from the last comment that this is Neek 😉 You might like Poldark. It is engaging x

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      1. Yes it’s Neek. I get a little carried away when posts are about history. Yours are always fascinating! Cousin Jacks? I will google that as I’ve never heard of that name. Anyways, off to try and find Poldark. Have a great day!

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      2. Thank you Neek, we did have a lovely day, so your wishes worked 🙂 I am a history buff too, a bit too crazy about it. What would we be without some perspective from the past, right? Ross Poldark’s brooding beauty might get you 😉

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      1. If you have seen the new one, the original will seem pretty primitive. It was in the early 70s and production values aren’t up to today’s standards. 🙂

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  2. Tin mining sounds like a job not for the faint of heart. To be working the day away in tunnels beneath the ocean. The rest of the coast is very pretty though, especially on such a sunny day as when you went there.

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    1. You got it. We were merely making our way down to explore them and these men made their way down almost every single day and even beyond to make their living. My heart went out to those poor souls and their families. Even the donkeys who would have been miserable for months beneath the sea in those tunnels. But yes, not to sound all morose, the coast is stunning. It makes you whoop.

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    1. Thank you milady, I did make it back home safe with more sun and loveliness. Shall put up a post. I have come back home a deep hazelnut brown from all the walking under the strong Cornish sun but boy it feels good 😉 xx

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    1. Hello Daniel and Niki, it seems you have been to Cornwall, maybe a few times too? Because who can go there just once 😉 Thank you for the lovely comment and the weather was fantastic. We have come back home a deep hazelnut brown and that speaks volumes about the perfect weather 🙂

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  3. Nimble steps are what I’d recommend for these pathways. Glad you made your way safely. It looks beautiful and great weather, too! 🙂 Thanks for the history lesson as well.

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  4. What incredible scenery and interesting history. All your photos are amazing but I particularly like the ones showing the dramatic path and cliffs (I’d be so into exploring this area!) Looks like you need to have to have your wits about you on those paths. I have to admit, I needed to look up Ross Poldark. Thanks for the introduction.

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    1. Your heart might go a little bump bump 🙂 I sense that you have a penchant for exploring dramatic landscapes and taking on challenges. Botallack awaits you. My precious husband made me run down some, after which I had to get on my bums and crawl down one of those heather covered slopes. He had a hearty laugh and recorded all of it on his phone. Imagine that. Hmph.

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  5. Maybe you didn’t see Demelza or Ross because it was too (Pol)dark! Oh my, such bad jokes. I would love to have the chance to explore such sights and the scary paths and mines. It was a harsh reality back then, I think the show does a great job in showing how hard life was for those who worked and depended on those mines to get their piece of bread! I love your articles, dear. They are always informative and fun and interesting. xx

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    1. Tee hee. It was dark and even darker where I did not tread (into the subterranean tunnels 😉 Maybe some day you will. Thank you Cheila 🙂 I love the show too but I do think there is a bit of glossing over reality here and there though it does a fantastic job of introducing readers/viewers to the entire concept of tin mining and the boom and bust phases that it went through xx

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  6. Beautifulpost and so well written, Dippy Dotty. hanks for the smiles. 🙂
    That’s one to save for us, I’d love to stay at the Pendeen Lighthouse one day.
    Best regards,
    The Fab Four of Cley

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      1. I asked Siri and Selma, they know such things. Of course, they said, there is one called the Thrilling Ghost, but he is a ghost apprentice still.
        Happy weekend
        The Fab Four of Cley

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