Chasing Illusions in Gudvangen

66 thoughts on “Chasing Illusions in Gudvangen”

  1. Gudvangen is small but its beauty is breath-taking. When i was there, there was a Viking-theme village with people in leather/fur and they sold bow, items made of wood etc. You can also rent a Viking boat (with a dragon head) to sail in Naeroyfjord. Kind of cool! 🙂

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    1. Absolutely cool. You must have got to attend the Viking festival, eh? They are apparently planning to set up a permanent village with the Viking theme. We did not rent a Viking boat (sounds darned exciting, bringing scenes from the TV show, The Vikings to mind) because sadly enough we had a long drive ahead back to our cottage.We were so beat!

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      1. I must praise your husband’s driving skill 🙂 The street to/from Gudvangen is so steep and with so many narrow turns. I visited the village only briefly while waiting for my ferry to Flam. But I was able to see the sailing Viking boat. It was small though, not like the gigantic Viking ships in the museum in Oslo 🙂

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      2. I have not been to Oslo but I can imagine the size of the ships just by shutting my eyes. Those Vikings never did things by halves, did they? Adi is a fantastic driver, thanks. But you know what was worse than the sharp turns? The effing long tunnels. The beauty of Flam too! It all is a beautiful dream, isn’t it, Norway that is? I would go back in a heartbeat.

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    1. Thank you Courtney 🙂 It was lovely though on hindsight it becomes even more special. Sometimes it takes a bit of stepping back from the moment to get the glory of it. I hope you do get the chance soon!

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  2. Excellent. And stunning pics.

    There’s every chance the Germans have a catch-all word for that strange feeling of simultaneous satisfaction/dissatisfaction. They have words like that. It will be long, and hard to pronounce, and surprisingly useful.

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    1. Hahaha is that so? My German is quite limited beyond the quintessential ‘thanks’, ‘please’ and ‘sorry’. I doubt my powers of guttural speech to catch it in any case. And thanks for the funny comment apart from the compliment of course.

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  3. I LOVE THIS. Seriously, you’re one of my favourite bloggers – everything you write (bar the serious and sad topics) always makes me laugh at least once. You fell prey to the Wikipedia trap . . . it happens to us all (unfortunately). What a gorgeous place, though! xx

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    1. Aw thanks Mia. That is something to perk up this Friday of fixing-the-apartment woes. It is just my thing to fall prey to ridiculously obvious things, isn’t it? (I mean I knew what Lofoten looked like since it has been on my list for some time now). Well we all come with our lot in life and mine is to be a goof *deep sigh

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  4. I love to see the hamlets surrounded by rising towers of land. I imagine such a simple life, though I’m sure everyone has their struggles. Imagine being among the first to land there and having your choice of where to build your home. Ugh, take me with you!

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  5. Who needs Wikipedia and their Photoshopped pictures when we have your amazing pictures ? You’re really skilled 🙂

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    1. Were you away on a long one and where all did you drive to? Now I guess it is time for you both to put up your feet. I have missed you guys. Thank you for the lovely words as usual, Norway is nothing less than magic.

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      1. We were gone for almost two weeks driving in weather that ranged from freezing to over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. A truly interesting trip that we hope to share in the future but right now, we’re pooped. We missed you too!

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  6. Wow, gorgeous place and interesting history. Loved the humor thrown into this post. Too bad about the drizzly weather. About the painful wrap purchase, I felt the same way traveling Switzerland. My siblings (who I was traveling with at the time) and I tried to split a meal to cut costs, apparently splitting food is not something that’s done in Switzerland… everyone looked down their noses at us. Our grubby hiking clothes probably didn’t help either…

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    1. I hear you. My husband compared eating in Norway to that in Geneva (I have not been to Switzerland yet). Then we went to Luxembourg. It is fair to say that we now know where not to go crazy ordering up meals. The first time when we visited Norway, I ordered up a simple cappuccino and a plate of nachos at a cafe. The bill stated £25 (converted of course). My husband sat and finished the nachos even though he cannot stand eating them. So there you go. I do not envy you your Swiss experience. I think in such environments I either go completely quiet or I shake with laughter. Either extremes not recommended xx

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  7. This is such a picturesque village sitting among beautiful rock walls. I want to walk on the path next to the river. It is interesting to imagine what vikings would have been thinking when they were boating through.

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      1. I am doing well; the weather is perfect for my outdoor activities. I have been enjoying your travel news and photos that I can dream on for now ?. Hope you are doing well yourself?

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  8. Beautiful pictures and so aptly written! Something similar happened during our road trip to Kaza in Himachal. The pictures we saw of small villages on various blogs were beyond words but not one mentioned that the weather there would be extremely harsh and we would be eating tons of dust. Even then we would love to visit those charming, non touristy villages again someday, just with a little more precautions.

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    1. It is a bummer to be kind of waylaid in the virtual world but then the good thing is that we get to explore reality 😉 It is also important to show the real picture always. Thanks for the kind words…

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  9. Those photos are so ridiculously beautiful! Simply breath-taking! You are indeed blessed to be able to visit such lovely places! 🙂

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  10. Dear Dippy, this is breathtakingly good!! Reading this at London airport I already feel refreshed and in the right mood heading home to Norway. Great post and superb shots!!
    Love, Dina ??

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  11. Pingback: Getting to Flåm – The Travelling Diary Of a Dippy-Dotty Girl
  12. Could anyone tell me whether it is possible to walk from Gudvangen to the base of the Kjelfossen waterfalls? How long does it take and is it suitable for someone who does not usually do much hiking beyond walking on the street?

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    1. You could if you wanted to. It is a short walk and you hardly need any hiking experience for it. You can see the waterfalls from Gudvangen.

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