The Manhattan Story

77 thoughts on “The Manhattan Story”

  1. What a beautiful description and history you’ve laid out for us here! Your writing is lovely in its descriptions and your photos transmit a great deal. Enjoy all of the new experiences!

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      1. I will be there soon! I’m even more excited for the kids as they’ve never been. I love just watching people and all of their variety. NYC is definitely a great place to do that.

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  2. great post, I visited NY a few years ago, but was crunched for time to visit all other tourist spots in the short time and missed out on these places, hope to cover these the next time! Have fun !

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    1. Thank you Nisha. There is always a next time and maybe you can do all of these justice with some more time on your hands 🙂 We walked in to open up a bank account that day because all the other branches were shut and for us the nearest one was in Chinatown. It worked pretty well for our first day in the city!

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    1. Well not a conventional start. I had always thought Central Park and Magnolia would be my first stops in the city. But hey, go with the flow is not a bad mantra when you have got to get work done 😉

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  3. Sounds like New York has welcomed you with open arms. I love the diversity of NYC, I didn’t know Chinatown linked to Little Italy, that’s neat! I can’t wait to hear more about your adventures in your new home 😀

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    1. It has been interesting. I wonder if there is anyone here who is not from somewhere else. It is the veritable melting pot of cultures it seems and that is a wonderful thing in itself. I am looking forward to discover it too Angela 🙂 xx

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  4. Don’t you just love being in a city with people from different backgrounds, from all around the world. That’s one of the things I miss about Canada. That said, I think you will have a lot of delicious food to discover in New York as well.

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  5. I expect New Yorkers don’t even see those fire escapes anymore! It’s amazing what you first notice when you see a place for the first time. I was right there with you and those dumplings…..yum. Whenever we are up in Londonwe always head to China Town for dumplings as I can only dream of them in Wiltshire. Was the food different to English Chinese? Love it. Thanks for the post. X

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  6. You really capture the spirit of the city that never sleeps. And there is some fascinating factual stuff in there too. I’m delighted you are back in the groove. You are a favourite of mine! Xx

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    1. Thanks Osyth! Those are the sweetest words. I am trying to get to know the city. London, Paris, Rome, Vienna…they incited love so very effortlessly, but with New York, I think I have to lend some patience xx

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      1. It’s a shock, I think. When I moved to Boston I struggled for quite a while – then my eldest daughter said ‘it’s a whole nother continent mummy, what do you expect’ … that reset my head and I found it so much easier after that. New York is a bout 50 steps up the ladder from Boston in terms of it’s personality. You will get there xx

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      2. My own wisdom is to find the value in the way things are …. sometimes it takes a little while but when you get there, it gets SO much easier xx

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  7. I’m new here, so I hope you’ll forgive what might be an overly familiar comment, but your writing is brilliant, the photography immersive (although the food shots are not going to be good for my diet).
    It’s been decades since I’ve lost myself in Chinatown, but your post brought me right back. Cheers!

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    1. Thank you Gabe. Such a lovely comment shall not be scoffed at, that I can solemnly vow. If this post is bringing you back into the folds of Chinatown’s plates of bliss, why I shall take a bow and consider my work done.

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      1. I wouldn’t dream of preventing the obligatory bow. Yet, I hope your work if far from done… 😉 We hungry bloggers need fresh sources to feed from regularly!

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      2. Tee hee. I am not Japanese but I believe I can do a fairly good job of it. As long as my posts do not make you hangry, all is well. And if they do, well, I accept only large-ish cupcakes (chucked at me).

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    1. Hah, I appear as a silhouette in the gold-framed glass door in the last post 😉 I shall make sure I put up some soon. The explorations are interesting. So is meeting the quintessential New Yorker. I am going about it slowly but surely xx

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  8. You are off to a good start in New York, my friend. I am green with envy, as I love NYC, and could do with a long walk through the colorful streets of Chinatown. And let’s be honest, I would only be walking for the sake of burning off all of the delicious food 😉

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    1. You are welcome to visit us! Yes an invite 🙂 Any time you want to come and go noshing about the streets of NYC. It is slowly growing upon me. Yesterday I quite enjoyed walking its streets and gaping at the buildings. How ridiculously high are they!

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      1. Oh my word, they are so tall. And it is strange coming from a small town–it is like a different planet. And thank you for the invite. If I can ever find decent airfare, I may make you live to regret it 😉 😛

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  9. Pingback: Mattress Hunting in New York – The Travelling Diary Of a Dippy-Dotty Girl
  10. Ok, I got up a short while ago and am hungry. =) Love the history! Had no idea…Calcutta’s Chinatown. Makes sense, though, the path they paved down from China, the spices they exchanged, also. So interesting how the Chinese made inroads into other cultures with their food. Koreans build churches on foreign soil, not restaurants. I was at the Wing…Co. back then on that trip with then fiance. And yes, I meant the Little Italy next door. I grew up with and on the fire escape. They’re part and parcel of NYC. Beautiful photos, wonderful job with the history.

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    1. Thank you Diana. That was my first day in Manhattan! And I love the memory of it already. I will always miss it too. What are the chances that we ate at the same eatery! You and I, only years apart. Not to know that we would meet each other e’en though virtually and talk about the Wong Co.! Life 🙂

      The Chinese changed cuisine for the world at large and who does not love a good Chinese meal? It is my comfort food. If you ever have Calcutta Chinese referred to as Indo Chinese, you will want to kiss their fingertips. I met one of the community in Leicester, UK, after we moved there and I was gung-ho. A bit too much I think now on hindsight.

      I wanted to go behind the counter and hug the old man. Then I proceeded to ask him if I could write a piece on him for the leading Calcutta daily – but he seemed alarmed. I had never had such a reaction before to prospective interviews and it amused me. Made me wonder about legality and other issues or maybe he simply did not want to be featured. His restaurant used to be quite expensive. Yet we were there every weekend with precision.

      One day after we moved to Northampton from Leicester, we found that the restaurant had shut shop because there was a fire. It was akin to the end of an era for us.

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