The Blue Star of the Lower East Side

76 thoughts on “The Blue Star of the Lower East Side”

    1. Hiya Kim, the thing with NYC is that it has enough little gems tucked into its streets, so you would need time. Next time you are there you can always swing by… Thank you 🙂 xx

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  1. The photos here are spectacular. I, like you, love museums and free is always good. However, since having children, museum visits haven’t been as relaxing and enjoyable as I would have hoped… my 10 year old is following in my footsteps though so I think it’s time to leave the others behind next time!

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    1. With your older child then, many hours of pleasurable museum browsing lies ahead. Here’s to that thought. xx

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  2. Oh yes… I love free museums. I always make sure to leave a ‘thank you tip’ if there’s a collection cup though. I somehow ended up in the Twinings museum in London some years ago. It was a lovely tea history lesson.

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    1. The Twinings museum must have been lovely. That is a good tip. I should practise it more often. Thank you for pointing that out. I do it only when I have change. Mostly I am cashless. xx

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  3. Loved reading about your serendipitous visit to the synagogue museum! The stained glass is beautiful and stunning. So glad to hear that it was restored and not destroyed. A funny story about your tour guide and the student. The photo of the contemporary skyline is a great counterpart to the historic Moorish architecture of the museum. Wonderful! – Neek

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    1. Thank you for that lovely comment, Neek. I enjoyed reading it 🙂 I find that contrast between the old and the new utterly charming. Have yourself a fun weekend 🙂 xx

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  4. I just love that New York has so many jewels tucked into nooks and crannies. I don’t think it’s even possible to discover them all, which is part of the beauty. I remember when you were preparing for the move. It makes me really happy to see you enjoying the exploration.

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    1. Thank you sweetie. It does have its individual charm, this great wonderful city. It is growing upon me steadily but surely. xx

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  5. What an amazing find on your wanderings! Wow, that blue window is something else. Thank goodness it’s been saved frankly. I love that you have written about a tiny corner of the city in such detail. It’s the small places that delight, isn’t it?
    Xx

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    1. Thank you Sophie. The hidden gems are the best finds during one’s explorations of any place. So yeah small places capture my heart too 🙂 xx

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    1. Hey Amor, yes poor boy indeed. I was amused by the look of utter astonishment on his face. Thank you my lovely. Hope you have a great week ahead. xx

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  6. Very nice, it’s amazing to bump into gems like these. Which reminds me that there is a fine looking medieval church right down the street from where I live which I have yet not bothered to visit , for past three years would you believe that, even though every time I cross it, I am stuck by its very antique self stuck between two very modern glass buildings xx

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    1. Go give it a go one day? It might pop a nice surprise 🙂 I am fascinated by the contrast between the old and the new. xx

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    1. I get it that you were confused about the comment getting lost. Well I have both now 🙂 Yes, I do Love the British Museum. Actually, I love most of the London museums. Thanks Brianji.

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    1. It was in the spam folder. Apologies for the wonky spam folder 🙂 Thank you for reading the post. Hope you are having a good week.

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      1. It is a fabulous novel by Boris Vian. Not too sure what the English title is… Froth on the daydream… Hmmm. No. Somethng is wrong about the translation. It happens. 🙂
        Hope all is well with you ma’amji.
        (Just laid my hands on the Ministry of utmost happiness. Daughter #1 finished it!) 🙂

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      2. Oh I have been eyeing it. I shall get cracking on reading it too. Her style of writing is utterly fabulous.
        I am good, busy writing and daydreaming about this summer.
        I will look up the novel in the library. Hopefully I can lay my hands on it. I thought the translation was a bit off. But I got the gist of it.

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      3. Well we plan to do a few trips around us. Let us see how my husband’s work lets up. It has been awfully hectic for him.
        Hopping back to the UK. Now that is more like a long-term plan 😉 Our big trip is going to be India and Hong Kong (possibly) at the end of the year. Adi has not been to HK and I wanted him to have a taste of it. How about your plans?

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      4. India and HK sounds good. I definitely need to put India on the “list”. (I would want to re-learn Hindustani first though) 😉
        Tickets and accomodation are fully booked for Paris in July-August. (Can’t wait)
        Best of luck for your husband’s job. It takes a while to settle down.

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      5. If you know Hindi (somewhere at the back of your mind), maybe it would not be that tough. Though I find the gender thing quite annoying. As for Paris, I would not want to wait too! We were dithering about it this time, but we decide on Asia for now. Hope you are having a nice weekend.

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      6. Thank you m’amji. As for Hindi… I only remember a few words of Urdu. So, yes, it probably wouldn’t be too hard. (I always find it fun to learn a language). Cheers

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      7. Well I would love to learn French. I keep learning it fits and starts, and wish I could speak it like a Parisian, with flair.

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      8. French sounds like a good objective. Much more complex than English which has virtually no grammar to speak of. I wonder whether there are now courses on line? (Flair will come naturally) 🙂

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      9. Well in fact I am on those online lessons from time to time. I have got to just sit through them at a stretch. But I believe when you live somewhere, the language just becomes a part of your daily living and that is what makes all the difference, non?

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      10. It does. There is no better way to learn a language. I did learn a bit of Hokkien in December in Singapore and Penang. Fun. I love languages.
        Continue avec les leçons en ligne. Tous les jours… 😉
        Attchah? (Pardon the spelling)

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      11. Achcha, I shall endeavour 🙂
        Hokkien…interesting! Languages are fascinating.

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      12. Bilkul… I will try to commit that one to memory. It does sound vaguely familiar. But so many things are but illusions. My parents would have know, they spoke fluent Urdu. (Bilkul!)
        Au revoir, ma’amji.

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      13. I am sure you must have used it at some point along with the head nodding. Quintessentially Indian. Bonne soirée Brianji.

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