Cataloochee Valley

26 thoughts on “Cataloochee Valley”

  1. Enjoyed reading the history of the Cataloochee Valley. Now, that’s a tongue twister! Yes, many have been displaced due to interstate roads, National Parks, and dams being built for the greater good but it’s always important to remember who it was that had given up so much in order for us to benefit in our present time. Thanks for reminding us of that. BTW, the bear definitely wanted to leave his mark on the place πŸ˜›

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    1. It is a tongue twister, I hear you. I uttered it over and over again because I could not help taking a fancy to it. These Native American names have more of a punch than regular English names.

      Thank you for the kind words. And hey, we take what we get. Even if it be just bear scat. :-/ SIGH

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    1. Hey AJ, you are so lovely to indulge my rambles. You know, I think my words do not do half the justice that these places demand. They make you want to write poetry. Now only I if was any good at that. πŸ™‚ xx

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    1. Hi Lorelle, thanks for the comment as always πŸ™‚ I wish words could communicate the beauty of the valley. xx

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  2. Wow! This was so beautifully written and also educational. Thank you so much for highlighting the history of the land and how the national park came to be. My ancestors harvested crops on that very land. Again thank you so much for sharing this captivating, informative piece!

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    1. Hiya Victoria, thank you for dropping by and leaving a comment. Did your ancestors live in the Cataloochee Valley then? Were they of the families I found out about such as the Colwells, the Palmers, the Messers, …. I would be eager to know more of course! You know how a place makes you curious about its people. πŸ™‚

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      1. Hi there my friend! My fathers side of the family are of Cherokee and European ancestry and did live in the valley though I’m not sure for how long or many details. This side of my families history is relatively new to me as I have just reconnected with them over the last 7 years, learning about our lineage, culture, and listening to their stories. I am interested to ask my Aunt more about our relation here and if/how we may be connected to the families you mentioned in your article. I have never been to see it for myself but through your words I felt the same sense I do when my family speaks of it.

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      2. It must be rather fantastic to get a sense of your ancestry. I guess as we grow older we learn the importance of knowing where you come from. I am reading Horace Kephart’s ‘Our Southern Highlanders’ and he writes so vividly that scenes from the book play out in the imagination every time I pick it up from where I left off.

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  3. I absolutely love the earliest days of fall. There’s just something in the air. Sort of an earthiness, for lack of a better word. This was an enjoyable read, Dippy, with some very pretty pics. From your narratives to the reliably solid research you put into your work, I always welcome a new post from you.

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    1. Thank you for the generous comment. You got me. I love my research alright. Comes from my days of reporting, I suppose. And hey, the admiration is mutual. Have a great Sunday! πŸ™‚

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