The Hilltop Neighbourhood of Paris

71 thoughts on “The Hilltop Neighbourhood of Paris”

  1. Dotty,

    Your photos and commentary are sheer joy to behold. The comments re: Hitler and Speer. It’s interesting that once the war had turned against Germany that Hitler had ordered the complete destruction of Paris. Fortunately, the general receiving the orders was a soldier and not a barbarian. Hitler would rather destroy everything he could not have. Such a little man in so many ways.
    On another note, your choosing to use B&W was so appropriate to convey the spirit of the city. Excellent! may I ask what camera you used?

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    1. Samsung Galaxy S8 Plus (Bresson would have fainted).

      Thank you for the kind words! 🙂

      A little man — that possibly captures his personality best. Actually we might run out of adjectives here. Isn’t there such irony in his appreciation of a city that he aimed to destroy? The stories from WWII are fascinating. I cannot get enough of them.

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  2. Great black and white photos. You even got a good shot of the details of a Wallace Fountain, which are really hard to capture in a photo.

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  3. I was a bit taken aback by the statue of St. Denis but then I thought this would be a perfect way to alleviate one of my migraine headaches 😉 Wonderful blogpost and photos! – Neek

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  4. Dippy, I’m loving your black and white atmospheric photos of Paris! It’s been ages since I walked around 18th but felt as if I was there with you.

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    1. Sheree, thank you. 🙂 I bet there are stories you have to tell about your ambles through Montmartre. Winter added to its charm. xx

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    1. Thank you, Arielle. It is possible to miss things in every place we travel to, is it not? But that is the charm of repeat travel, to see a place more thoroughly. I enjoy the process of seeing places time and again. As for Montmartre, I loved the quiet winter vibes of it. Cheers! xx

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    1. Thank you, Lorelle. I had to force myself from not putting up more because my fingers were quite busy. Those alleys of Montmartre were entrancing. More so, because there were no crowds. 🙂

      You have a fun weekend too. xx

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      1. Oh I have to agree with you there about the crowds! You were there in December right?
        Though the last time we went in September, crowds weren’t too bad. Not as bad as July/ August 🤦‍♀️

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      2. Yes. That said, the last time I visited it was in autumn which I adored. The crowds were manageable then – you are right.

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  5. I felt like I was in Montmartre reading this post. Wonderful. Poor Jack. And I love the ‘diamantiferous mud’ description of Pigalle. That could still apply. Montmartre might have changed beyond recognition, but Pigalle is still sleazy.

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  6. I’m loving your B&W tour of Paris. What a great idea to showcase Paris. I’m also loving all the bistros and boulangeries and biscuiteries, and the fact that some stoic Parisians are sitting outside. Poor St. Denis!

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    1. Thank you, Caroline! I quite liked the idea of Determined Denis.
      The best part about sitting outside is the hint of chill along with the wonderful warmth radiated by the patio heaters … and a glass of red wine to go with it. 🙂

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      1. I have just revisited your beautiful post. We are heading to Paris in a few days and I can’t wait to explore this part of the city. Hope all is well with you guys!

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      2. Hey Caroline, good to hear from you. Are you in Paris still? We have been traipsing all around Tuscany and then some of the Balkans. So been quite off the blogging circuit but hope to get back to it soon. Safe travels! xx

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  7. A superb Paris stroll ma’amji. Your B&W focus does bring out the winter grey. Really fab.
    (I could almost feel the cold…)
    I love the Passe-Muraille. My sister used to live nearby and it was our usual route up.
    Much easier that taking the stairs which are bloody murder.
    Now the “magasin d’habits”? I’m almost positive i’ve passed by last year.
    Need to check my files.
    Be good.

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    1. Merci beaucoup! The Passe Muraille is unique. I have not seen the likes of it anywhere else and it quite stuck in my mind. That lane up was lovely. Your sister lived in a lovely spot.

      Did you mean the Rue Houdon boutique?

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      1. That statue was made to honour Marcel Aymé, a French writer who lived nearby. My father had a lot of his books. I might even have “le passe-muraille” still. Oh, oh! I don’t. Where can it be?
        Yes that boutique. Though I’m not sure about the street. That one is coming down from Montmartre to Pigalle and I seem to recall seeing it somewhere else. Maybe a branch. 🙂

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      2. I’ve had in mind of getting that stuff back and store it properly. I mean my brother’s been great at storing it for… nearly ten years now, but I need to have another look at what’s in there and probably get a storage room. 🙂 (Don’t we all love treasure hunts?)

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      3. As you know I have finally managed to get all my books in a “Library”. (Colonel Mustard and all that). I call the library The India room. 😉 I’ll post why someday.

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      4. For the record, I suck at Cluedo. I remember The India Room and it would be an interesting read, this future post.

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      5. Never tell a story in advance, spoils the fun. But what I have in mind is a series of photographs of the room, the art, and the books. I could do it tomorrow, my desk is in there! But I always forget.
        Cluedo? I think we mentioned it before. 🙂 Winning is not the important thing it’s the atmosphere. I loved that game as a child then played it with our daughters.
        Cheers ma’amji.

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      6. I have faint stirrings of a Cluedo conversation, now that you mention it. Since I have never won at it, you can imagine it rankles!

        As for the post, let the story unfold at your own pace. Cheers.

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      7. Heh actually I played it more with Adi and our friends. Adi almost always won.

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      8. Non. He is a consultant, into automation (AI). 🙂 But he is darned good at calculating the odds.

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    1. Well 6 days was as good as it got. As for mileage, it was not too bad. Our best was 10 miles on the last night — legs like loose pegs.

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  8. Hello beautiful, I am starting to catch up with your blog and what best than your Paris series. How long did you stay in the capital?
    I am familiar with some of these gems shown in your pictures but I don’t know the vast majority. Which was your favourite part of the 18th arrondisement? Also, Jack 😍

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    1. Six days to be precise, V. One day was reserved for a day trip to the Alsace region.

      Thank you, lovely! It is difficult, almost impossible to see everything, isn’t it? Even a local, I bet, does not know and see everything that is around him. The quiet, cobblestoned alleys were my pick there, V, along with the Passe Muraille.

      Jack was one of my highlights too, though he was outside of the 18th arrondissement. xxx

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  9. I had to look at your post again ma’amji. Bresson indeed. Just fab quality photographs. I don’t think Bresson would have fainted. He would have been very interested. My brother saw him once. In May 68 on the barricades. My brother. Bresson was taking pictures. With a small Leica if I recall.

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    1. Why that is mighty rich, Brianji! I am so ill equipped to handle compliments that I end up hemming and hawing at them. Thank you.

      The picture you created with the date and the image of barricades, your brother as an onlooker, and Bresson with his Leica…marvellous.

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      1. keep hemming and hawing. Well deserved.
        And as for my brother he was actually ON the barricade, all for the eyes of a pretty philosophy Maoist student. Both eventually were arrested and tried. Much to the dismay of my parents. Not convicted. I still have the court’s documents! 😉

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      2. I would say! What children put their parents through is remarkable. But high adventure for your brother.

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  10. Beautiful B&W photos! This post reminds me the quote by Thomas Jefferson: “A walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty, and in the point of Life.”

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    1. Cheers Megala! Thanks for sharing the quote too. Jefferson clearly found his inspiration in the right place.

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  11. You weave a magical tale of Paris through your atmospheric BandW pics and descriptive words. It’s been years since I was there but your posts have transported me. Wonderful! 🙂💕

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  12. Beautiful pictures! Wait, did you really say ‘Samsung 8 Plus’? Wow!!! Brilliant! And when you mentioned about roast chicken I was quickly reminded about La Fontain de Mars. We had roast chicken there and half the time I was thinking about Mr Obama and Michelle dining there. 🙂

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    1. Thank you Amor. Yes, I am a fan of phone cameras. 🙂 There are times though when I feel the absence of an SLR.
      Now I have not been to La Fontain de Mars, but sounds like you were in illustrious company. Any time I hear roast chicken, my mouth waters alarmingly. Maybe tonight I shall make it a roast chicken night just to satisfy this sudden craving. 😉 xx

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      1. La Fontaine is really just a bistro but yeah I suppose it became famous because of the Obamas. It must be liberating to just bring the phone to take pictures. I still bring along my DSLR you know hahah old school. I plan to buy a mirrorless next time hoping it’d be slimmer.

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      2. You know, I wholeheartedly nod in favour of old-school everything. Naturally the DSLR wins the debate effortlessly. xx

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