On the Trail of Bonny River Towns

49 thoughts on “On the Trail of Bonny River Towns”

  1. The Red Mill is such a beautifully preserved place. I loved The Bunker Hill school and the photo of the children who had attended long ago – how solemn they look! What a great visit to such a historic place. Thanks for sharing it and also your encounter with a skunk 😉 Neek

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    1. Hehehe, thank you for noting the skunk-y details of this post, Neek. The Red Mill was so engaging. I loved it! Hope you all are doing well. xx

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      1. Yes, we are despite having another aftershock early this morning from the Ridgecrest quake. We are hoping things get better for the residents in that area. Hope you have a great weekend!

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      2. I just heard about it. Glad you are safe. It is literally shaking to feel the tremors. Amen to the thought of residents recovering from the effects of it. You too have a good weekend, Neek. *hugs

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      3. Hurricane Barry was headed for New Orleans, Neek. And now I believe it has spared New Orleans and visited Louisiana instead. It is bright and sunny here. Hope you have been having a relaxed weekend. xx

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  2. What a delightful introductory paragraph. It got me hooked into the story. The mills are stunning and the scenery around them so beautiful. Recently, I’ve been reading about Victorian children, their education, diseases and aspirations and your words and images made me curious to continue my research to the other side of the pond. Hope summer continues going well on your side.

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    1. Hey V, thank you. 🙂 I think these old towns full of Victoriana would be up your alley, and what with the various styles of architecture to browse through, you would be a busy bee.
      Wish you a wonderful London summer too love! xx

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  3. I love your visits to these small towns. Your photographs are really interesting; you have such a great eye for composition. And I love reading your introduction as well. I’ll come along to these villages any time. I need to get out and take some little wanders to small towns around me. I take them all for granted as I’ve lived here for so long! Thanks for the inspiration. 🙂

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    1. Aw thanks Cathy! Gladdens my heart to read this. We are trying to make the most of these weekends. Since we love antique-ing, it feels grand to stumble across these towns and go a little berserk trying not to pick up every neat thing we come across. I know that it is easy to take things for granted. We are all guilty of it.
      You have a fun weekend. xx

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    1. They are aren’t they? If I could, I would live in a barn or a mill. 🙂 You have a great weekend too, Lorelle. xxx

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  4. Lotta history here! though modern compared to spot in England. (sorry!) Dippy Dotty Girl, I love your graceful and thoughtful text articles. How long does it take you to write them? It seems to flow so naturally, but I’ll bet a lot of writing and rearrangement may be involved to achieve the natural effect. Love it! 🙂

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    1. Hehe, I hear you Theresa. You said it. 🙂
      Thank you for the words. It did take me time because I am flitting in between writing and attending to house guests for a month and you know writing requires solitary sessions. It is not easy to disengage from everything and just keep writing. I see why people attend retreats! Love and hugs. xx

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      1. House guests! That’s a commitment. And in July – I’m imagining it’s warm temperatures and muggy there in NJ. 🙂 Yes, having time to oneself and the quiet space to write is a gift. Have a wonderful weekend! xx

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      2. It is. The in-laws. 🙂 It is hot but not yet too humid, the latter in fits and starts. The unbearable version of it shall arrive in a month. I think one needs a coffee shop a step away, a quiet room and a whirring fan for company, to write peacefully. 😉 Hope you are having a wonderful weekend too, lovely. xx

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    1. Thank you Jo. 🙂 Hahaha, I like your observations. To dabble your toes by a mill is a fine, fine idea. As good as scones and tea after a long hike. xx

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    1. I have hardly come across average Thai in this country yet, you know. So I was a bit bummed. The law of averages had to level it out for me. 😛 The scoop shop is reserved for our next trip back to Clinton, because it is too pretty not to see again. 🙂 xx

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  5. What a charming town, but I must admit I got stuck at the cat photos—big fan of felines, particularly Main Coons. The old photos are great; everyone looks so “put together”, even the workers.

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    1. Danke schoen, Caroline. The Maine Coons are such feline supermodels! I am not a big fan of cats (more of a dog person), but it was easy to fall in love with these beauties that kept curling themselves around my legs. I get what you mean by ‘put together’ wrt to the people from those old photos. I am fascinated by them. They speak volumes if you look at them long enough.
      Hope you have a productive week. xx

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  6. Still exploring America? 🙂
    Been out of the blogosphere for almost 2 months. 6 weeks in Paris were a hard sacrifice. 😉
    Sorry to report I din’t find Tagore in the boxes that were at my brother’s.
    😦
    (But we didn’t have time to open all the boxes – brought Tolstoï’s War and peace back though – so I have hope for next year.)
    Hope all is well with you.
    Cheers

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    1. Nah exploring Europe and you know how it sinks its claws in. Now returning home should be a chore. I can well believe that Paris occupied all your time and blogging must have been right behind everything else. Just as it should.

      No worries about not spotting Tagore. Books come and go. War and Peace is one of the best. Enjoy reading it again.

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      1. Yes, Europe “doth” sink its claws in. 🙂 (And I never travel and blog. No time. The blogging comes back afterwards.
        War & peace I’m glad I’ve brought back along with one and half suitcase of books. I think I only to go Paris to buy books. 😉
        But before Tolstoï, I’ve just read King Lear. I thought I’d already read it, but no. What a book. And what misery did one live – or die – in in those times.

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      2. It is but one of the greatest. I have forgotten King Lear almost. Time to revisit it perhaps. 🙂

        Blogging can wait. While travelling, there is no time for anything else, but living in the moment. I hear you.

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      3. All Shakespeare is worth a visit or re-visit. Macbeth is probably my favourite. (Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow…) 😉
        I also go back to Enid Blyton when I want something fresh to briefly alleviate the world’s atrocities. Just moved Kamala Markandaya to the re-read shelf. 😉
        Be good ma’amji.

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      4. She was born in Mysore in ’24. Married an Englishman after the war and went to live in the UK. All her books are about India. Pieces of history now. 🙂

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